It’s time to take charge of your recovery and develop a plan. Whether you’ve been recently diagnosed, or you’re several years post-discharge, specialized services are available for your unique recovery needs.



Bladder

Bladder cancer is more common in men than women. Treatment of bladder cancer can involve surgery, immunotherapy, and chemotherapy. Functional complications of bladder cancer include lymphedema, ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, urinary incontinence and pain.

Brain

Brain cancers can be either primary (i.e. gliomas such as glioblastoma multiforme (GBM)) or metastatic from other cancers (i.e., lung, colorectal). Treatment often includes surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Functional complications of brain tumors include ADL impairments, dysarthria, dysphagia, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, incontinence, spasticity and pain.

Breast

Breast cancer is the most common cancer type in women. Treatment of breast cancer can involve surgery (mastectomy and breast reconstruction), chemotherapy, radiation, hormonal, and targeted therapies. Functional complications of breast cancer and its treatment include lymphedema, ADL impairment, shoulder problems, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy and pain.

Colon & Rectum

Colorectal cancer is the 3rd most common cancer type in both men and women. Surgery is the most common treatment for colorectal cancers that have not spread. Chemotherapy, radiation, and target therapy are often used for more advanced disease. Functional complications of colorectal cancer include lymphedema, ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, stool incontinence and pain

Head & Neck

Head and neck cancer is a diverse group that includes cancers of the oral cavity, pharynx, and other structures. Treatment of head and neck cancer often involves surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Functional complications of head and neck cancer and its treatment include ADL impairment, dysarthria, dysphagia, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, lymphedema, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, trismus, and pain from shoulder and neck dysfunction.

Kidney

Surgery is the primary treatment for most kidney cancers. Functional complications of kidney cancer include ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, and deconditioning.

Leukemia

There are many types of leukemia and treatment depends considerably on type. Chemotherapy is used for most acute leukemias. Targeted drugs are effective for treating chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML) because they attack cells with the Philadelphia chromosome. Stem cell transplantation is sometimes needed. Functional complications of leukemia and its treatment include ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, graft vs. host disease, and pain.

Liver

Early stage liver cancer can sometimes be treated successfully with surgery to remove part of the liver. Targeted drugs are sometimes a treatment for patients who are not candidates for surgery. Functional complications of liver cancer and its treatment includes ADL impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning and pain.

Lung & Bronchus

Lung and bronchus cancer is the second most commonly diagnosed cancer in both men and women. Treatment depends on the size and type of tumor but may include surgery, radiation, chemotherapy, immunotherapy, and/or targeted therapy. Functional complications of lung and bronchus cancer and their treatment include ADL impairment, pulmonary dysfunction, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and pain.

Lymphoma

Lymphoma is broadly classified as either Hodgkin lymphoma or non-Hodgkin lymphoma. Treatment varies by disease type but often includes chemotherapy, radiation, targeted immunotherapy, and stem cell transplantation. Functional complications of lymphoma and its treatment include ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, graft vs. host disease and pain.

Multiple Myeloma

Multiple myeloma is often treated with chemotherapy and occasionally radiation therapy for isolated tumors. Stem cell transplantation is occasionally used. Functional complications of multiple myeloma and its treatment include ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, graft vs. host disease and pain

Pancreas

Pancreatic cancer treatment includes surgery and often chemotherapy. Functional complications of pancreatic cancer and its treatment include ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy and pain.

Prostate

Prostate cancer is the most common cancer in men. Treatment includes surgery, radiation and sometimes hormonal therapy. For advanced disease chemotherapy is often used. Functional complications of prostate cancer and its treatment include lymphedema, ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, and urinary incontinence.

Spinal Cord

The spinal cord can be damaged by tumors originating in the spine, or more commonly by metastatic tumors from other locations (i.e., breast, prostate). The treatment of spinal cord tumors may involve surgical resection, radiation, or chemotherapy. Functional complications of spinal cord tumors include ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, erectile dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, incontinence of bowel and bladder and pain.

Thyroid

Most thyroid cancers are highly curable but there are exceptions. Treatment usually includes removal of the thyroid and sometimes the nearby lymph nodes. Radioactive iodine is often used. Complications of thyroid cancer and its treatment include ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, and pain, especially of the neck and shoulder.

Uterus & Ovary

Uterine and ovarian cancers have been increasing in incidence. Treatment of gynecologic cancer may involve surgery, radiation, hormones, and/or chemotherapy, depending on the stage of disease. Functional complications of gynecologic cancer and its treatment include lymphedema, ADL impairment, mild cognitive impairment, gait dysfunction, fatigue, deconditioning, chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy, pain, sexual dysfunction, and urinary incontinence.
  • abnormal swelling

    Lymphedema is the abnormal accumulation of fluid in a body part due to removal of lymph nodes or radiation. Lymphedema can occur in any part of the body including the arms, legs, face, neck, trunk, abdomen, or genitals. Swelling from lymphedema differs from post operative swelling which may develop immediately after surgery but usually resolves in 1-2 months. Therapists will use specialized techniques such as compression (with bandages or garments) muscle pumping exercises, and manual drainage to decrease the fluid build up.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Lymphedema Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapeutic strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • erectile dysfunction

    Cancer treatments such as surgery and radiation may cause issues with male erections and sexual function because of damage to the pelvis. Sexual activity may become painful or difficult. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release soft tissue restriction that may be the cause of pain and other issues. Therapist instruct patients on home exercises to improve strength and control of the pelvic muscles.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Bladder cancer survivors may experience pain caused by chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, plexopathy, and other casues. A plexus is a network of nerves in the neck (cervical), shoulder (brachial), and pelvis (lumbosacral) that are important relay points for nerve signals. These structures are commonly damaged by cancer and treatments such as surgery and radiation. Damage to the plexus is known as plexopathy (or plexus sickness) and can cause weakness and sensory problems including pain, burning, or tingling. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the various structures damaging and irritating the plexus nerves. These techniques are also combined with exercises to optimize strength and range of motion of the effected area.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • painful sex

    Cancer treatments such as surgery and radiation may damage the muscles and other soft tissues of the pelvis known as the pelvic floor. Sexual activity may become painful or difficult because of these changes. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the soft tissue restrictions that may be the cause of pain. Therapist with teach home exercises to improve strength and control of the pelvic floor.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • urine leakage

    The inability to control bladder function can result in small amounts of urine leakage or complete loss of control over urination. Symptoms can range from occasional leaking due to coughing or sneezing to strong sudden urges that make it difficult to get to the bathroom in time. Therapists will instruct patients on exercises to increase pelvic floor muscle strength as well as strategies to optimize urinary function.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty speaking

    Slurred, choppy or mumbled speech that is difficult to understand is called dysarthria. Changes in voice quality such as hoarseness, scratchiness or stuffiness could also be signs of dysarthria. Speech therapists teach exercises of the tongue, jaw, and diagphragm to improve the quality and clarity of voice.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Speech & Language Therapy
  • difficulty swallowing

    Difficulty with swallowing is called dysphagia. People are not always aware of the presence of dysphagia. If swallowing problems are not treated food and liquids may accidently enter the lungs - a disorder called aspiration that can lead to pneumonia (lung infection). Speech therapists teach exercises to improve swallowing and compensatory techniques to ensure safe swallowing.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Speech & Language Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Brain cancer survivors may experience pain caused by neuropathic pain, spasticity-related pain, and other causes. Nerve-related pain may present as burning, tingling or abnormal sensations that can come and go unrelated to specific activities. Pain may also be due to severe and lasting muscle spasms known as spasticity, commonly found in people who have experienced brain or spine injuries.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • urine leakage

    The inability to control bladder function can result in small amounts of urine leakage or complete loss of control over urination. Symptoms can range from occasional leaking due to coughing or sneezing to strong sudden urges that make it difficult to get to the bathroom in time. Therapists will instruct patients on exercises to increase pelvic floor muscle strength as well as strategies to optimize urinary function.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • abnormal swelling

    Lymphedema is the abnormal accumulation of fluid in a body part due to removal of lymph nodes or radiation. Lymphedema can occur in any part of the body including the arms, legs, face, neck, trunk, abdomen, or genitals. Swelling from lymphedema differs from post operative swelling which may develop immediately after surgery but usually resolves in 1-2 months. Therapists will use specialized techniques such as compression (with bandages or garments) muscle pumping exercises, and manual drainage to decrease the fluid build up.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Lymphedema Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty rotating shoulder

    Loss of motion in the shoulder can be caused by surgery, radiation or chemotherapy and limit ability to perform normal activities such as bathing, dressing, reaching and/or lifting. Therapists use hands on techniques to improve soft tissue tightness limiting shoulder motion. Therapist will teach exercises to improve range of motion and strength.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Breast cancer survivors may experience pain caused by shoulder dysfuntion, aromatase inhibitor arthralgia, chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, post mastectomy pain, and other causes. Post mastectomy pain may be found in the chest wall, armpit, arm as a result of mastectomy (breast resection), breast reconstruction, or radiation for breast cancer. This pain tends to be a burning, tingling, sharp and does not go away over time. Therapists will perform hands on techniques and instruct in specific exercises to reduce the pain associated with this syndrome.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • abnormal swelling

    Lymphedema is the abnormal accumulation of fluid in a body part due to removal of lymph nodes or radiation. Lymphedema can occur in any part of the body including the arms, legs, face, neck, trunk, abdomen, or genitals. Swelling from lymphedema differs from post operative swelling which may develop immediately after surgery but usually resolves in 1-2 months. Therapists will use specialized techniques such as compression (with bandages or garments) muscle pumping exercises, and manual drainage to decrease the fluid build up.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Lymphedema Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • erectile dysfunction

    Cancer treatments such as surgery and radiation may cause issues with male erections and sexual function because of damage to the pelvis. Sexual activity may become painful or difficult. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release soft tissue restriction that may be the cause of pain and other issues. Therapist instruct patients on home exercises to improve strength and control of the pelvic muscles.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Rectal cancer survivors may experience pain caused by chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, and/or plexopathy. A plexus is a network of nerves in the neck (cervical), shoulder (brachial), and pelvis (lumbosacral) that are important relay points for nerve signals. These structures are commonly damaged by cancer and treatments such as surgery and radiation. Damage to the plexus is known as plexopathy (or plexus sickness) and can cause weakness and sensory problems including pain, burning, or tingling. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the various structures damaging and irritating the plexus nerves. These techniques are also combined with exercises to optimize strength and range of motion of the effected area.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • painful sex

    Cancer treatments such as surgery and radiation may damage the muscles and other soft tissues of the pelvis known as the pelvic floor. Sexual activity may become painful or difficult because of these changes. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the soft tissue restrictions that may be the cause of pain. Therapist with teach home exercises to improve strength and control of the pelvic floor.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • stool leakage

    Bowel incontinence is the inability to control your bowel. Severity ranges from small amounts of stool leakage when passing gas to complete loss of control. Therapists will teach patients exercises to increase pelvic floor muscle strength and control and strategies to optimize bowel function.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty speaking

    Slurred, choppy or mumbled speech that is difficult to understand is called dysarthria. Changes in voice quality such as hoarseness, scratchiness or stuffiness could also be signs of dysarthria. Speech therapists teach exercises of the tongue, jaw, and diagphragm to improve the quality and clarity of voice.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Speech & Language Therapy
  • difficulty swallowing

    Difficulty with swallowing is called dysphagia. People are not always aware of the presence of dysphagia. If swallowing problems are not treated food and liquids may accidently enter the lungs - a disorder called aspiration that can lead to pneumonia (lung infection). Speech therapists teach exercises to improve swallowing and compensatory techniques to ensure safe swallowing.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Speech & Language Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • face/neck swelling

    Lymphedema is the abnormal accumulation of fluid in a body part due to removal of lymph nodes or radiation. Lymphedema can occur in any part of the body including the arms, legs, face, neck, trunk, abdomen, or genitals. Swelling from lymphedema differs from post operative swelling which may develop immediately after surgery but usually resolves in 1-2 months. Therapists will use specialized techniques such as compression (with bandages or garments) muscle pumping exercises, and manual drainage to decrease the fluid build up.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Lymphedema Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Head and neck cancer survivors may experience pain from surgery and scarring, shoulder dysfunction, chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, cervical dystonia, trismus, and other causes. Pain, weakness and/or loss of motion in the shoulder can be caused by surgery, radiation or chemotherapy. This loss of function may limit ability to perform normal activities such as bathing, dressing, reaching and or lifting. Therapists use hands on techniques to release soft tissue restriction that may be causing these limitations. Therapists will instruct the patient in exercises to improve range of motion and strength.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • reduced mouth opening

    Inability to fully open the mouth is known as trismus. Normal mouth opening is at least 35mm (or a little more than an inch) - about the width of 3 fingers. Trismus can be caused by tumor, bone problems, surgery, or radiation to the head or neck. Trismus can result in difficulty eating speaking, brushing your teeth, etc. Therapists will perform hands on techniques and teach specific exercises to reduce pain and improve the mobility of the jaw to allow for greater opening of the mouth.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Leukemia survivors may experience pain from chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, graft vs. host disease (GVHD), and other causes.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Liver cancer survivors may experience pain caused by chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, abdominal pain, and other causes. Abdominal pain can be caused by soft-tissue and organ damage from radiation or surgery. Constipation can also cause abdominal pain. Abdominal pain can often be managed by specially trained professionals known as pelvic floor therapists. These therapists use manual techniques to relieve abdominal pain and teach range of motion and strengthening exercises to stabilize the abdominal region.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty breathing

    Lung and breathing difficulties caused by certain cancers and treatments include shortness of breath, painful breathing, slowed rate of breath or breathing outside the normal pattern. Therapists will provide exercises to improve breathing and stamina.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Damage to nerves and muscles of the chest and ribs from chest surgery (thoracotomy). Pain is usually described as radiating from back to front of the chest. Pain may be sharp, burning or stabbing but may also be described as dull, achy or cramping. Patients may find discomfort in sudden movements such as coughing or laughing or light sensation such as wearing clothes. Therapists will perform hands on techniques and instruct in specific exercises to reduce the pain associated with this syndrome. Pain in the chest can also be casued by irritation of tissue surrounding the lungs (pleurisy). Pain usually increases when breathing in and may cause shortness of breath and local tenderness. Therapists will perform hands on techniques and instruct in specific exercises to reduce the pain associated with this syndrome. Therapists will also instruct in breathing techniques for maximum efficiency.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Multiple myeloma survivors may experience pain from chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, bone fracures and other causes. Plexopathy is a disorder that effects a network of nerves resulting in the symptoms such as burning , tingling , loss of muscle control and altered ability to feel sensations such as hot, cold and light touch. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the various structures that could be causing nerve irritation. These techniques are also combined with exercises to optimize strength and range of motion of the effected area.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Pancreatic cancer survivors may experience pain caused by chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, abdominal pain, and other causes. Therapists will implement manual techniques to relieve abdominal pain caused by soft tissue restriction such as scarring and radiation fibrosis. Therapists will also instruct in range of motion and strengthening exercises to stabilize the abdominal region.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • abnormal swelling

    Lymphedema is the abnormal accumulation of fluid in a body part due to removal of lymph nodes or radiation. Lymphedema can occur in any part of the body including the arms, legs, face, neck, trunk, abdomen, or genitals. Swelling from lymphedema differs from post operative swelling which may develop immediately after surgery but usually resolves in 1-2 months. Therapists will use specialized techniques such as compression (with bandages or garments) muscle pumping exercises, and manual drainage to decrease the fluid build up.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Lymphedema Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • erectile dysfunction

    Cancer treatments such as surgery and radiation may cause issues with male erections and sexual function because of damage to the pelvis. Sexual activity may become painful or difficult. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release soft tissue restriction that may be the cause of pain and other issues. Therapist instruct patients on home exercises to improve strength and control of the pelvic muscles.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Prostate cancer survivors may experience pain caused by chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, plexopathy and other causes. Plexopathy is a disorder that effects a network of nerves resulting in the symptoms such as burning , tingling , loss of muscle control and altered ability to feel sensations such as hot, cold and light touch. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the various structures that could be causing nerve irritation. These techniques are also combined with exercises to optimize strength and range of motion of the effected area.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • urine leakage

    The inability to control bladder function can result in small amounts of urine leakage or complete loss of control over urination. Symptoms can range from occasional leaking due to coughing or sneezing to strong sudden urges that make it difficult to get to the bathroom in time. Therapists will instruct patients on exercises to increase pelvic floor muscle strength as well as strategies to optimize urinary function.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • erectile dysfunction

    Cancer treatments such as surgery and radiation may cause issues with male erections and sexual function because of damage to the pelvis. Sexual activity may become painful or difficult. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release soft tissue restriction that may be the cause of pain and other issues. Therapist instruct patients on home exercises to improve strength and control of the pelvic muscles.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Spinal cord cancer survivors may experience pain caused by chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, plexopathy, and other causes. Plexopathy is a disorder that effects a network of nerves resulting in the symptoms such as burning , tingling , loss of muscle control and altered ability to feel sensations such as hot, cold and light touch. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the various structures that could be causing nerve irritation. These techniques are also combined with exercises to optimize strength and range of motion of the effected area.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • painful sex

    Cancer treatments such as surgery and radiation may damage the muscles and other soft tissues of the pelvis known as the pelvic floor. Sexual activity may become painful or difficult because of these changes. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the soft tissue restrictions that may be the cause of pain. Therapist with teach home exercises to improve strength and control of the pelvic floor.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • stool leakage

    Bowel incontinence is the inability to control your bowel. Severity ranges from small amounts of stool leakage when passing gas to complete loss of control. Therapists will teach patients exercises to increase pelvic floor muscle strength and control and strategies to optimize bowel function.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • urine leakage

    The inability to control bladder function can result in small amounts of urine leakage or complete loss of control over urination. Symptoms can range from occasional leaking due to coughing or sneezing to strong sudden urges that make it difficult to get to the bathroom in time. Therapists will instruct patients on exercises to increase pelvic floor muscle strength as well as strategies to optimize urinary function.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Pain, weakness and/or loss of motion in the shoulder can be caused by surgery, radiation or chemotherapy. This loss of function may limit ability to perform normal activities such as bathing, dressing, reaching and or lifting. Therapists use hands on techniques to release soft tissue restriction that may be causing these limitations. Therapists will instruct the patient in exercises to improve range of motion and strength.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • abnormal swelling

    Lymphedema is the abnormal accumulation of fluid in a body part due to removal of lymph nodes or radiation. Lymphedema can occur in any part of the body including the arms, legs, face, neck, trunk, abdomen, or genitals. Swelling from lymphedema differs from post operative swelling which may develop immediately after surgery but usually resolves in 1-2 months. Therapists will use specialized techniques such as compression (with bandages or garments) muscle pumping exercises, and manual drainage to decrease the fluid build up.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Lymphedema Therapy
  • bathing/dressing difficulty

    Difficulty with activities of daily living (ADL) such as bathing, dressing, cleaning, cooking, driving, or balancing a checkbook are common in cancer survivors. Occupational therapists will help identify these problems and provide therapy and strategies to help improve functional abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
  • difficulty thinking

    Difficulty remembering, searching for certain words, sequencing events, multi-tasking, concentrating, making decisions, and other cognitive problems often result from cancer treatment. This is known as mild cognitive impairment. Therapists will teach patients strategies to help improve their cognitive abilities.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Occupational Therapy
    • Speech & Language Therapy
    • Neuropsychology
  • difficulty walking

    Difficulty walking, or gait dysfunction, is characterized by changes in the normal walking pattern, feelings of instability or decreased walking speed. Patients with gait dysfunction are at increased risk for falling. Therapists will teach exercises to improve leg strength, range of motion and balance to help individuals walk more safely.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
  • extreme tiredness

    Fatigue is extreme tiredness that is not relieved by normal rest. Fatigue may be accompanied muscle aches and irritability. Therapists will teach aerobic, resistive and flexibility exercises to reduce fatigue and improve activity tolerance. Activity modification and energy conservation strategies may also be taught.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • generalized weakness

    Deconditioning is a decrease in strength and energy levels that may affect ability to perform daily tasks such as walking up stairs, lifting household items and walking. Deconditioning can become so severe that it affects ability to bathe and dress. Therapists may treat this condition by providing education on how to perform tasks more efficiently to conserve energy through the use of equipment such as shower chairs, reachers, etc. Your therapist may also work with you on implementing strategies focused on when to perform certain tasks based on energy levels and/or home programs to help you increase overall strength and endurance.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • numbness/ tingling

    Certain chemotherapeutic medications can damage the nerves resulting in pain, burning, tingling, weakness, trouble walking and other problems. This condition is known as chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN). CIPN tends to effect hands and feet but can affect any part of the body. The symptoms associated with CIPN may effect activities of daily living (ADL) such as opening a jar or buttoning a shirt. Therapists will use a variety of techniques to alleviate pain and improve fine motor skills. Strengthening and balance exercise are taught to improve strength and endurance and decrease falls.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • pain

    Uterine cancer survivors may experience pain caused by chemotherapy induced peripheral neuropathy, plexopathy, and other causes. Plexopathy is a disorder that effects a network of nerves resulting in the symptoms such as burning , tingling , loss of muscle control and altered ability to feel sensations such as hot, cold and light touch. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the various structures that could be causing nerve irritation. These techniques are also combined with exercises to optimize strength and range of motion of the effected area.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Physical Therapy
    • Occupational Therapy
  • painful sex

    Cancer treatments such as surgery and radiation may damage the muscles and other soft tissues of the pelvis known as the pelvic floor. Sexual activity may become painful or difficult because of these changes. Therapists will perform hands on techniques to release the soft tissue restrictions that may be the cause of pain. Therapist with teach home exercises to improve strength and control of the pelvic floor.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy
  • urine leakage

    The inability to control bladder function can result in small amounts of urine leakage or complete loss of control over urination. Symptoms can range from occasional leaking due to coughing or sneezing to strong sudden urges that make it difficult to get to the bathroom in time. Therapists will instruct patients on exercises to increase pelvic floor muscle strength as well as strategies to optimize urinary function.


    Therapy Option(s):
    • Pelvic Floor Therapy